Produce CSA 2016

It’s never too soon to pick the farmer who will grow your fresh produce all season long. At Barefoot Farm & Flowers we grow beautiful, healthy and delicious produce just for you! Our gardens are lovingly tended to provide fruits and vegetables of the highest quality and amazing variety. Go ahead and taste right out of the crate- we never spray with dirty chemicals.

What’s in a typical crate? So much mouthwatering goodness that you won’t know where to begin. How about starting with a full salad? The first week of June usually bears two heads of Romaine lettuce, a bunch of rainbow radishes, a bundle of touchstone gold beets, garlic scapes, fresh garlic, rainbow chard or dinosaur kale, a pint or two of super sweet strawberries,
a few baby zucchinis, a bag of premium cut salad greens, snow peas, basil and a carton of pastured eggs.

Our CSA will provide your family with a dining adventure for a full 25 weeks. Each week your farmer will harvest the best produce that is grown in season, to fill your crate. Salad items will be included weekly, along with other seasonal produce as it ripens. Carrots, summer squash, cucumbers, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, tomatoes, potatoes, onions, sweet peppers, hot peppers…sweet blackberries, fresh plums, crisp apples, melon…too much to list. 

Do you want to make pickles? Can your own tomato products? We’ve got you covered there, too. You can order bulk boxes of pickling cukes and canning tomatoes. Always wanted to try making your own sauerkraut? Kim-chi? Then you’ll want to order extra heads of our cabbage.

As the summer fades into fall and the weather takes a cooler turn our produce will provide a basis for hearty soups and sides. Purple potatoes, kale, onions, winter squash, pie pumpkins- all make eating at home a cozy affair. Along with the produce you’ll also find grass fed & finished ground lamb and beef, ground sausage from our pastured pigs, and even a holiday turkey.  Your farmer knows how to feed your family right!

Want to stock your freezer with exceptional meats that were humanely raised and harvested? Our pastured pork, grass fed lamb and beef shares might be just what you need. You can purchase pork and beef by the side or half while the lamb is sold whole.

How much will it cost? $900 will get you 25 weeks of nourishing, flavor packed local food grown by your farmer just for you.

Can I make payments? Yes! A non-refundable deposit of $100 paid when you sign up will hold your share. After that, your balance due is broken down into three easy installments.

  1. February 25th $300
  2. April 25th $300
  3. May 15th $200

Of course, you can always pay in full at any time. Paying in full helps your farmer to purchase the seeds, soil amendments and equipment needed to start planting right away. You can expect your first share between the last week of May and the first week of June, depending on when the strawberries are ready.

Where do I pick up my crate? You can pick up directly off our farm in Clatskanie, Oregon or at our conveniently located Hillsboro site. We will also be offering a pick up site in Astoria this year. Days and times for 2016 to be announced soon.

I’m in- Sign me up! Welcome to the farm, you savvy eater! Soon you’ll be dishing up some delightful fare.

Print out an Order Form here

Please mail payments along with order form to Barefoot Farm & Flowers 77568 Erickson Dike Road Clatskanie OR 97016

I’ll reserve your spot as soon as I receive your deposit.

Questions? Contact Farmer Linda barefootfarmflowers@yahoo.com

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Six Weeks and Counting Down

The calendar doesn’t lie. Six more weeks until our first CSA delivery for 2014. Looking out the window all I see is grey skies and pouring rain. It’s hard to imagine that in less than two months we’ll be on the cusp of summer and jumping back into the frenzy of early morning  harvesting, crate filling, delivering, early evening picking, weeding…but the calendar doesn’t lie. It’s waiting just around the corner.

And this farmer is ready to embrace it with open arms. On days like this one, where you just can’t get warm or stay dry I’m even more thankful for my seed room. It’s a little oasis waiting just for me. As soon as I step in the door the warm air wraps around me like a friendly hug. It smells like dark dirt and green life. It smells like hope and promises of good things to come.

By now all the benches are groaning under the weight of seed trays and pots. Some are freshly planted, not a sprout in site. The tiny seeds tucked under a blanket of soil. I pull back the covers and take a peak, looking carefully and longing to see a tip of green. Other trays are bursting with green fingers raised towards the light. I check the soil, and give just enough water so they don’t dry out. Rotating the trays so the plants grow strong and straight. And then there are the red solo cups. Hundreds and hundreds of red solo cups. Filled with tomato and pepper starts, each labeled carefully with the plant variety. It’s Tuesday, and that means each plant gets a drink of half strength fish fertilizer.

I check the board on the wall. Today more carrots will get seeded outside, another flat of kholrabi needs to be started, two more trays of romaine lettuce, I’d better get more snow peas in the ground…I look out the window to see if the rain has stopped. The sun is trying to shine and the rain is just a fine mist. I throw on a jacket, grab a bucket of peas and head out.

This will be my third planting of peas. The first planting was slow to start, even in the raised beds. Raised beds tend to warm up quicker and allow for an earlier planting. But the first planting was spotty so I went back through and planted again, just in case. Now the peas are making a dense green row and I’m thankful that I filled in the blanks. I plant what’s left in my pea bucket, taking time to pull any weeds that are sprouting along with the peas. I can work at a leisurely pace right now, but soon it will be more frenzied and it’s  always best to get the weeds when they first rear their heads.

As I pass by the rabbit hutches I take a minute to give the rabbits the contents of my weed bucket. They gobble the weeds down, turning the weeds into fertilizer that will eventually go back into our soil. We’ve staged rabbit hutches within all of our garden areas. The rabbits help clean up weeds and vegetables that don’t make it to the table. Their fertilizer provides a rich planting humus that encourages earth worms and provides us with a beautiful tilth for growing our fruits and vegetables. Eventually the rabbits provide meat for our farm and our patrons. Life on the farm is a circle of sorts. Nothing is wasted and everything has its place.

But now the sun is out and the rain has stopped. I quicken my pace- there is so much still left to do with six weeks to go and counting down. The calendar doesn’t lie and the clock doesn’t stop.